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Broilers!!!.

 
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wayland



Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 2189


Location: The Sunny South East

PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2017 7:49 pm    Post subject: Broilers!!!.  Reply with quote

We brought 12 day olds six weeks ago. We have not kept Broilers for many years and these yokes are unbelievable. They remind me of a class of obese children trying to run in a playground. They just eat until their crops are near to burst then lay around until they have room for more food. I am told that they can suffer a broken leg because of their great bulk! So I guess its not a good idea to try and grow them on for breeding purposes. Have any of you tried this?
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drowned_pig



Joined: 30 Apr 2015
Posts: 315


Location: Ennis, Co Clare

PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 9:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We've just got our second batch of them. The chap selling them told me the commercial growers have a feeding system where the food is scattered for 15mins (using something that sounds like a sprinkler) and whatever falls falls, that's all they feed them for the day. they really are eating machines and would just gorge themselves stupid if you let them.
With regard breeding them I believe it's a cross between an Indian game cock and a Cornish hen. I doubt any of them would live long enough to breed 'from', again our dealer told us that either their legs or their hearts will give up by 14 weeks and to be honest we found ours waaaaaay to big at 10 weeks old.

I'm curious to hear what you think of their flavor I find it compares favourably with commercial shop bought birds but much less flavoursome than my six month old backyard chucks (albeit 3 times the size)
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Natterjack



Joined: 20 Oct 2012
Posts: 326


Location: North Kerry

PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll have to try some, they sound like unnatural weird creatures though.
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Natterjack



Joined: 20 Oct 2012
Posts: 326


Location: North Kerry

PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

But they'd have to be cheap, as I can buy an oven ready large free range chicken for around 10 euro.

And it's an almighty hassle, plucking and gutting.

I guess if I had their food for free it'd be worth it, but if you just raise em on bought pellets, you're basically just reproducing what you could buy, possibly for the same or more cost.
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DerynC



Joined: 03 Nov 2015
Posts: 197


Location: North Kerry

PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

They cost around 2.50 to buy but the shop bought ones never taste quite the same. Our last one weighed 3.75kg at 9 weeks and reckon it costs us just under the 10 euro to raise. With 2 of us that's a fair few dinners but they are ugly buggers. The only good thing is they hardly have any feathers to pluck
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Natterjack



Joined: 20 Oct 2012
Posts: 326


Location: North Kerry

PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DerynC wrote:
They cost around 2.50 to buy but the shop bought ones never taste quite the same. Our last one weighed 3.75kg at 9 weeks and reckon it costs us just under the 10 euro to raise. With 2 of us that's a fair few dinners but they are ugly buggers. The only good thing is they hardly have any feathers to pluck


The few feathers thing makes me more tempted.

We did some Cockerels a few years back. What a palaver.

All that plucking and gutting for a scrawny end result :0
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Sean Ph'lib



Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Posts: 485



PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm only thinking... if you have to feed them on some kind of pellets and they can't  free-range and get most of their food from grasses, herbs, insects etc and can't get loads of exercise running around. ... what would be the difference between them and the bog-standard supermarket chicken?  I think I'll stick to my spare cockerels who do all the aforementioned activities, live to six or eight months and yield a carcase which is one of the most delicious foods that money cannot buy!
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wayland



Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 2189


Location: The Sunny South East

PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I processed six today using the hot water method. This is not a method that I am used to so I Googled the info. With the water temp at 145 f I dipped the birds until the wing feathers  became loosened. The plucking was so much quicker than the dry method but the end result did not look as good. While plucking the wing feathers and around the parsons nose a small amount of red fatty stuff started to weep onto the flesh . Is this normal? These remarkable birds were 9 weeks old and weighed from 5.5 to 7.5 lb. The gutting process revealed lots of fat in the body cavity. Did I over feed them? Compared to the many normal birds that I have reared over the years these modern broilers look fantastic. Apart from a slight red tinge to the skin. Six more to go  
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DerynC



Joined: 03 Nov 2015
Posts: 197


Location: North Kerry

PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We have never had fatty stuff weeping out but have never done the hot water method. Don't know if that has something to do with it. We have had fat in the body cavity before  and wondered if it was the feeding but they taste good anyway.
Good luck with the next 6
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Carlarua



Joined: 21 Oct 2011
Posts: 1178


Location: West side of meath

PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 11:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What's the name of the breed Wayland ?
And how is the taste compared to shop bought chicken ?

We killed a few roosters a few years ago, and the husband would usually be in charge of the cleaning out while I would do the plucking. He was ready to start the cleaning out when he got an urgent call from work. It was a warm day, so I decided to do the job, in the back yard, on a tree stump with a bucket between my legs and my then 10 year old lady helping out. I didn't realize that bird innards aren't the same as mammal innards, there is no membrane around the innards that makes it easy to pull those out.
Also, the body cavity wasn't very big, so I had to squeeze my hand in. When I did that, a very loud squeek came out of the bird's neck. I wanted to drop the bird, but it didn't come off as it was a tight fit. And every time my hand moved, a squeeky noise came out of the neck. So  I did what any sane person would do and nearly wetted myself laughing. 😀
Thank goodness none of the neighbours saw, or I would have probably been carted off to the nearest home for the Bewildered.
This "The Good Life" lark isn't for the faint hearted
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blowin



Joined: 13 Dec 2006
Posts: 4306


Location: Tubbercurry , Co Sligo

PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2017 12:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

  Hi Carla, you certainly have a knack for telling a tale .  

We raised broilers a few years ago expecting them to taste much like the shop-bought ones but they were a lot better in both flavour and texture. I preferred them to the rare breeds which I found a bit gamey.
ATB
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wayland



Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 2189


Location: The Sunny South East

PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2017 7:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice one Carla.
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wayland



Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 2189


Location: The Sunny South East

PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The last two will be processed today. Quite an experience it has been. After eleven weeks I am expecting them to be 8 lbs +. So! Observations. The meat quality I must say is not the best. Ours were free ranged which improves them from supermarket yokes but I have tasted better. Having said this the speed with which they grow is astonishing. All this weight has to be got from somewhere of course and without commercial feed stuffs their full potential would not be met. Slaughtering has a few issues, namely we found that a few literally broke their wings while hung up. This was remedied by dropping them head first into a large bucket for a short while which stopped them from thrashing about to much.  The thrashing about is important to aid "Bleeding" of course. As to the plucking, not a pleasant job me thinks. I tried both dry and wet and although using the hot water speeded up the job no end, if I had just a couple of birds to do I would do them dry. So would I get them again? Probably, but to me taste is king so the next batch will be bred at home.

Cheers
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Carlarua



Joined: 21 Oct 2011
Posts: 1178


Location: West side of meath

PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does it have a "weaker" chicken taste ? I often find that the slower something grows, the tastier it is.
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wayland



Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 2189


Location: The Sunny South East

PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Carlarua wrote:
Does it have a "weaker" chicken taste ? I often find that the slower something grows, the tastier it is.


That could be the word to describe them. They do taste nice but I have had better, or should I say tastier. We cant expect everything and with the phenomenal growth rate being a big plus we have to except a lesser flavour. Its also been fun   .
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Sean Ph'lib



Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Posts: 485



PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally, I'd rather a rabbit.  Regarding chicken,  I prefer to treat it as a luxury rather than a staple and have it only on special occasions. An old-breed cockerel, slow-grown, free-ranged, corn-fed, dry-plucked - it doesn't get better than that!  But I agree, you can't have that every day - but neither would I want to - it would spoil its specialness.

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