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The black art of making yoghurt

 
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Carlarua



Joined: 21 Oct 2011
Posts: 1178


Location: West side of meath

PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 11:58 am    Post subject: The black art of making yoghurt  Reply with quote

I bought a yogurt maker a while back from lidl. You know what it's like shopping there ; you go there for a packet of biscuits and a tin of tomatoes and you come back with a drill, blister plasters and a yogurt maker...

Anyways, over the past few weeks, it's been hit and miss, and trawling through the internet, information often is contradictory. Many people, mainly in the US, also use their oven to make a gallon of yogurt at a time. Mine is just for about 2 pints.
It also takes up a lot more time than going out to the shop and getting a tub of yogurt ; 10 hours in the yogurt maker, 24 hours in the fridge to cure, about 1 hour to strain into a thicker Greek type yogurt.

There seem to be 2 rules for success :

1. Use the freshest milk you can get. The higher the fat content, the better. The same goes for the starter culture. Fresh and high in fat. Anything else gives a sloppy or curdled result

2. Gently warm up the milk, to take the chill of the fridge out of it. Then in the yogurt maker, add the starter and gently stir and let the contraption do it's work.

Thundery, muggy weather seems to have an effect on it. A batch I tried ended up lumpy and too sour for human consumption, but the dogs loved it.

Does anyone know if I can freeze the starter ? For that, you can use shop bought yogurt or a powder that you can buy in a health shop, or you can keep a spoon or 2 from a previous batch of home made yogurt. The problem with the last option is that the yogurt doesn't thicken as much as the original batch, so you have to use a new starter regularly.
So I'm wondering if yogurt cultures would survive the freezer.

As for the results, I prefer the home made yogurt over the shop bought one, because there is nothing added that you don't want to, like sugar or sometimes inulin (made I think from seaweed to thicken).
Once you get into the timing of the whole thing, it's no hassle really. And it's handy to have in the house, I would eat a lot of it, with oat bars I make and fresh fruit in the morning.

The whey gets poured over the dog food, and they go mad for it. I used it in baking bread too, but that wasn't a great success.
I have no idea what else I could use whey for. Probably to tenderise meat, but it doesn't look very appetising
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wayland



Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 2189


Location: The Sunny South East

PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 4:37 pm    Post subject: Re: The black art of making yoghurt Reply with quote

Carlarua wrote:
I bought a yogurt maker a while back from lidl. You know what it's like shopping there ; you go there for a packet of biscuits and a tin of tomatoes and you come back with a drill, blister plasters and a yogurt maker...


   Just got back from there. Her indoors said "Damn, we forgot the blister plasters .

We have never made Yogurt. I thought it was just what milk did on its own . Gloria thinks her Gran just added Rennet.
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Sean Ph'lib



Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Posts: 485



PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've made it many times in a thermos flask.  Warm the milk to blood heat, add a couple of spoons of live yogurt, chuck it in a thermos and leave it, wrapped in a towel, in a warm place for 24 hours.
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DerynC



Joined: 03 Nov 2015
Posts: 197


Location: North Kerry

PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 8:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Carlarua
I make yoghurt regularly in a yoghurt maker. I use milk that's unpasteurised straight from the goat. well not literally, it goes in the fridge first til i get round to it.
I heat it up to just about boiling then let it cool to blood temperature before adding the culture. I use live plain yoghurt to start it off with the longest shelf life I can find. I add about a small yoghurt pot in quantity to each batch which is about 2 litres at a time.
I save about the small yoghurt pot quantity to use for the starter and can keep reusing my yoghurt for quite a while until it stops working. It only takes 6 hours to make and then cool it in the fridge and its ready to eat.
That was the instructions that came with it and have had no problems
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Carlarua



Joined: 21 Oct 2011
Posts: 1178


Location: West side of meath

PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd love to get my hands on goat's milk ! The local shops don't stock it anymore and there's no one local I know if who has goat's.
As for the 6 hrs to make, I'll give that a try, as the yogurt seems to have set by then. I just left it at 10 hrs, as that's what the instructions that came with the maker said to do.

Sean, it's really difficult to find a good flask like they used to make years ago (the ones with the glass inside ; those things used to be sold separately in case you were not careful enough). They're also fickle to clean out properly. Nowadays, it's only the full metal flasks you can find.

Wayland, rennet is for cheese ! 😉
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Sean Ph'lib



Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Posts: 485



PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 7:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I never knew that about modern flasks. Mine is nearly as old as myself!  I think what Wayland was referring to, regarding rennet, was junket, which is like yogurt only sweet instead of sour and made with rennet.
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Carlarua



Joined: 21 Oct 2011
Posts: 1178


Location: West side of meath

PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of the kids broke my flask, Sean. I haven't managed to replace it with an equally good one.
There used to be flasks with a wider neck and body to keep soups and stews warm too! My dad used to take that to work in winter.
We brought ours with us when we moved to Ireland nearly 20 years ago. I feel like my grandma saying that 😀

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