Country Talk and Tips Forum Index Country Talk and Tips
Smallholding & country life IN IRELAND
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   Join! (free) Join! (free)
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Bees and CCD!!.

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Country Talk and Tips Forum Index -> bees
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
wayland



Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 2189


Location: The Sunny South East

PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 8:47 am    Post subject: Bees and CCD!!.  Reply with quote

Did any of you watch Monty last week?. These Top frame hives look strange to me but do seem to have some advantages. I digress. In the program some University had developed a way of checking the DNA of Honey. This process identified the plants foraged by the bees which made up the particular sample. The interesting result was that dependant on the season the bees much preferred  traditional forage crops to peoples exotic flowers in their gardens. The likes of Hawthorn, Elder, Willow etc. This University is asking for honey samples to be sent to them so they can analyse your honey. Gardeners World web site carries the details for those interested.

While on the subject of gardening and forage crops for bees, which the seed companies are cashing in on. My bees in the past have suffered tragically from CCD. In every case the colonies had ample stores. This must be born in mind. The trouble is not the lack of forage crops but some other malady.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
drowned_pig



Joined: 30 Apr 2015
Posts: 315


Location: Ennis, Co Clare

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes saw the program Wayland, it would be very interesting I'm sure to check the DNA of your honey. We got a nuk the other day ..very excited to get started, the chap we it it from has over 90 hives we haven't planted anything specifically for the bees other than borage but we have lots of hawthorn already growing on our plot.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sean Ph'lib



Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Posts: 485



PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good luck with your bees.  What you have growing on your plot will have no bearing on the success or failure of them.  Bees forage over a huge area;  If you could take a string a mile long and, with it, desribe a huge circle with your hive as its centre,  what's growing within that circle will have a big effect on your bees.  You could probably lengthen your string to two- or even three - miles to take in effective honey-gathering space for your bees!  What I mean is:  it's what's growing in your general area for miles in every direction that counts.  An acre of white clover growing in the middle of the Sahara desert wouldn't support a beehive whereas miles of roadside verges (if safe from idiots with herbicide sprays) would do so.
  Incidentally, that's why any honey you see labelled as "organic" is a fraud.  I use zero sprays or artificial fertilizers on my holding, but I would not claim my honey to be "organic".  How could any beekeeper say that his bees will not draw honey from a pasture four miles away from their hives which has been fertilized?  Or from apple trees that have been sprayed?  It's a complete fraud.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
wayland



Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 2189


Location: The Sunny South East

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 8:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well said Sean. We had a trip to a Wexford lavender farm... In their gift shop they were selling "Lavender Honey"! The lavender field itself was claimed to be two acres. So without straining my maths too much. one acre = 220 yds x 220 yrds. x 2. I wonder how they kept there bees within  this small area?. They cant of course. As to "Organic"! As Sean has said. The vast distance in square acreage that a Bee can forage.... Perhaps they dont feed sugar in the winter and leave some of their own stores.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sean Ph'lib



Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Posts: 485



PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't feed in the winter either- I leave every hive a full super of their own honey, plus what they have in the brood chamber -  but could I say for certain that their own honey is "organic"?  I'd venture to say it's as "organic" as you can get, but I couldn't swear some of my bees didn't fly into a neighbour's field and suck up nectar from white clover which had been grown with artificial fertilisers - and neither could any other beekeeper,  unless he or she lives on an island five miles offshore (and I'm pretty certain any such beekeepers don't exist).

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Country Talk and Tips Forum Index -> bees All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Card File  Gallery  Forum Archive
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Create your own free forum | Buy a domain to use with your forum