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New firewood shed
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Sean Ph'lib



Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Posts: 410



PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2017 6:20 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote

Blowin, if you stack turf properly, you don't need any kind of shed to keep it dry - and you definitely don't need pallets under it.  First and foremost, the place to dry turf - and the only place - is in the bog.  In the old days, people would never even contemplate bringing turf home from the bog until it was bone dry.  And once it is properly dry and stacked properly, it will stand any kind of weather.  Sometimes a bit of tarpaulin was tied over the top of the reek,  but if a reek is properly made, even that isn't  necessary.   I don't cut turf any more, but I will try to get a photo of a properly made reek. Most important thing to remember:  if it's not dry enough to burn, don't put it in a shed!
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wayland



Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 2074


Location: The Sunny South East

PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2017 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blowin. Your my hero. You take the saying "Make do and mend" to a whole new level
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Natterjack



Joined: 20 Oct 2012
Posts: 306


Location: North Kerry

PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2017 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sean Ph'lib wrote:
Blowin, if you stack turf properly, you don't need any kind of shed to keep it dry - and you definitely don't need pallets under it.  First and foremost, the place to dry turf - and the only place - is in the bog.  In the old days, people would never even contemplate bringing turf home from the bog until it was bone dry.  And once it is properly dry and stacked properly, it will stand any kind of weather.  Sometimes a bit of tarpaulin was tied over the top of the reek,  but if a reek is properly made, even that isn't  necessary.   I don't cut turf any more, but I will try to get a photo of a properly made reek. Most important thing to remember:  if it's not dry enough to burn, don't put it in a shed!



Really? Wow, I'd be interested to see a reek.
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Sean Ph'lib



Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Posts: 410



PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2017 11:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have a look at this: www.lougogan.com/achill/achill-turf.php?part=4
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blowin



Joined: 13 Dec 2006
Posts: 4242


Location: Tubbercurry , Co Sligo

PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2017 3:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm , I was hoping you were going to say what a great job I am doing , even if you added "for a blowin" .
But seriously , many thanks for the advice, Sean, and I agree with all that you say.  
Some years I simply don't have the option of leaving it on the bog until it is completely dry. The contractor who seems to have the monopoly for that area doesn't get to my patch until he's finished all the rest. Last year it wasn't cut until mid June . It still wasn't dry by the time the sloping bank was getting too slippery for a quad and too soft for tractor & trailer so we had to bring it home when we could.
In some previous years I've left the particularly wet stuff up there , stacked into reeks on pallets laid 4 square. Well, an attempt at reeks anyway. The outer layer to about 2 sods deep got "blown" into that soft spongy texture by rain and frost but the rest survived tho of course it hadn't dried . The challenge was then to move it before the next year's lot could be spread so I had to bring it home wet anyway.
I've found that using pallets in the stacks enables me to build high and wide without loosing stability, and the turf in the centre does actually dry . Without them anything below the top 2 sods comes out as wet as it went in , even after several months. I am in a particularly damp area.
I've come to the conclusion that working one's own turf feels good but really isn't very practical when you're getting on a bit and don't have a pool of labour to call on at short notice. In fact I'm not going to cut any this year. Will concentrate on timber instead. I am lucky enough to have plenty of that around.
I don't think I'll give it up completely tho because I do get immense satisfaction from seeing it nicely freed in the dry indoor shed. Then it seems a shame to burn it !
ATB
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Torc



Joined: 29 Jan 2007
Posts: 554


Location: North Clare

PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2017 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My neighbour tells me you have to have lots of tay on a bog for washing down the sangwidges or else you can't work. Herself should make the tay in jamjars, slip the jamjars into woolen socks and tie them on the handlebars.
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Natterjack



Joined: 20 Oct 2012
Posts: 306


Location: North Kerry

PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2017 8:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Torc wrote:
My neighbour tells me you have to have lots of tay on a bog for washing down the sangwidges or else you can't work. Herself should make the tay in jamjars, slip the jamjars into woolen socks and tie them on the handlebars.



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wayland



Joined: 14 Dec 2006
Posts: 2074


Location: The Sunny South East

PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2017 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Natterjack wrote:
Torc wrote:
My neighbour tells me you have to have lots of tay on a bog for washing down the sangwidges or else you can't work. Herself should make the tay in jamjars, slip the jamjars into woolen socks and tie them on the handlebars.



 

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